NPR News

Pages

A Blog Supreme
5:37 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Jazz Journalists Association Recognizes Its Musicians Of The Year

Herbie Hancock speaks at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Induction Ceremony 2013 at Harvard University. The JJA awarded the pianist with a Lifetime Achievement Award on Tuesday.
Gail Oskin Getty Images

Longtime friends and collaborators Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter headline the winners of the 2014 JJA Jazz Awards for musical achievement, which were announced today.

Read more
Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
2:58 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Marie Marcus On Piano Jazz

Marie Marcus.
Courtesy of the artist

Marie Marcus was a remarkable stride pianist and a protégé of Fats Waller. A native of Boston, Marcus played in all the jazz hot spots before settling down in Cape Cod, where she became known as the Cape's "First Lady of Jazz." On this 1993 program, she talks about Waller, her mentor, and performs a medley of his most famous tunes.

Marcus died in 2013 at age 89.

Originally recorded May 5, 1983. Originally broadcast Oct. 15, 1983.

Read more
Song Travels
2:17 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Dee Dee Bridgewater On 'Song Travels'

Dee Dee Bridgewater.
Courtesy of the artist

Jazz vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater has worked with legends such as Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins and Horace Silver.

Read more
A Blog Supreme
12:10 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

5 Points Where Poetry Meets Jazz

Jayne Cortez in 1996. The poet often recorded her poems to improvised music.
Bob Berg Getty Images

Read more
Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
1:02 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Andrew Hill On Piano Jazz

Andrew Hill photographed in his home, 2005.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Fifty years ago today, Andrew Hill recorded what would become his signature album: Point of Departure. Fifty years later, it still sounds like it could have been recorded yesterday. Assembling a murderer's row of horn players (Eric Dolphy, Kenny Dorham, Joe Henderson) with a rhythm section for the ages (Hill, Richard Davis, Tony Williams), Hill juxtaposed complex, layered harmonies with charged grooves. The result occupies that rare territory between the comfort of the familiar and the allure of the perceptibly unique.

Read more
Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
1:14 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Joanne Brackeen On Piano Jazz

Joanne Brackeen.
Courtesy of the artist

Joanne Brackeen has been called the "Picasso of jazz piano," a nickname that encompasses her adventurous style and visionary approach.

Read more
Your Money
11:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Minorities' Savings Accounts Aren't Adding Up For Retirement

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, last week we talked with a former teacher who said that teachers of color are more likely to quit than others. And she offered some thoughts about why that is. This week, we get a different perspective from another teacher, also of color, who has 13 years in and is still going strong. And we'll hear from her in a few minutes.

Read more
Education
11:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Classrooms Getting More Diverse, But Teachers Of Color Struggle

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Children's Health
11:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Toddler Removed From Home After Viral Swearing Video

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, we're talking about something you might have talked about yourself with other parents or friends if you've seen this video.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: You a hoe (bleep).

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: You a hoe (bleep).

MAN: What's up then?

Read more
World
11:41 am
Mon January 13, 2014

'Weight Of The World' On Syrian Boy's Shoulders

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 1:42 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, the good news in many cities is that the murder rate is at historic lows, but the bad news is that many of those murders remain unsolved. We'll take a look at New York City, where a newspaper's close look at the issue is raising some uncomfortable questions about race and geography. But first, we return to a major international story that's also provoking some uncomfortable questions for world powers - the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Syria.

Read more

Pages