NPR News

Federal investigators have interviewed top aides to Hillary Clinton about her use of a private email server, the latest advance in an ongoing investigation into whether her email practices as secretary of state may have compromised classified information, according to two people familiar with the matter.

The interviews, of close aides including Huma Abedin, have been conducted by FBI agents, lawyers from the Justice Department's National Security division, and prosecutors from the U.S. Attorney's Office in Alexandria, Va.

Starting Wednesday night at sunset, Israel marked Holocaust Remembrance Day. Commemorations continued in schools around the country Thursday, including in kindergarten classes.

This year, Israel is fully implementing a Holocaust curriculum for kindergartners.

"We need to teach the kindergarten teachers what to do on Yom Hashoah, because they have to make sense of the day," says Yael Richler-Friedman, using the Hebrew name for the remembrance day.

So here we are. Noisily embraced by the plurality of Republican voters, not-so-quietly reviled by most Republican leaders, Donald Trump is all but assured that party's presidential nomination.

Journalists astonished at the result — and believe me, most are stunned by what has unfolded — find themselves confronted by some form of this question: Are the media to blame for Donald Trump?

An airstrike hit a refugee camp in Syria near its border with Turkey, and activists say at least 28 civilians were killed.

NPR's Alice Fordham tells our Newscast unit that "only the Syrian regime and its allies conduct strikes in the area." Here's more from Alice:

"Activists in the camp in the province of Idlib uploaded video of women and children wounded in the strike being evacuated in flatbed trucks. Tarpaulin tents are flattened.

Don't add House Speaker Paul Ryan to the list of Republicans who are, even reluctantly, backing de facto GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

"I'm just not ready to do that at this point. I'm not there right now," the party's 2012 vice presidential nominee said in an interview on CNN's The Lead with Jake Tapper.

The Wisconsin Republican signaled he would eventually like to support Trump, who became the GOP's likely White House nominee this week after both Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich withdrew from the race.

Let's say you're an environmentally motivated eater. You want your diet to do as little damage as possible to our planet's forests and grasslands and wildlife.

But how do you decide which food is greener?

Take one example: sugar. About half of America's sugar comes from sugar cane, and half from sugar beets. They grow in completely different climates. Sugar cane is a tropical crop, and sugar beets grow where it's colder and dryer.

Each one has an impact on the environment — sometimes a dramatic impact — but in very different ways.

It looks like more bad news for the new executive director of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. Brian Newby is already being sued by the League of Women Voters for his decision earlier this year to allow Kansas and two other states to require residents to show proof of citizenship when they register to vote using a federal form. The move effectively reversed a long-standing EAC policy.

A day after the Justice Department said a North Carolina law violates the Civil Rights Act, the state House speaker says lawmakers will not meet the DOJ's deadline to respond.

In the case of the infamous serial killer dubbed the "Grim Sleeper," a Los Angeles jury has found Lonnie Franklin Jr. guilty of killing nine women and one teenage girl over the course of more than 20 years, from the 1980s to the early 2000s.

In 1965, the trumpeter, composer and arranger Thad Jones and the drummer Mel Lewis found themselves with a book of big-band music originally intended for the Count Basie Orchestra — and nobody to perform it. So they made their own. They handpicked some of New York's top talent and called rehearsals on Monday nights, when the studio musicians could actually make it. And by the time they debuted on a Monday in February 1966 at the famed Village Vanguard, they were already a force to be reckoned with — soon to become the most influential big band of the last 50 years.

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