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The Two-Way
7:08 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Maine Fisherman Catches His Second Rare Lobster

Fisherman Bill Coppersmith named the rare lobster "Captain Eli" after his grandson.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 8:23 pm

Bill Coppersmith, a fisherman in Maine, might want to buy a lottery ticket. He's gotten pretty lucky lately. This week he caught a rare orange lobster while fishing with his sternman Brian Skillings, writes the Portland Press Herald.

The paper talked to Robert Bayer, executive director of The Lobster Institute at the University of Maine, who said that the actual odds of catching an orange lobster would just be a guess. But "it's one in several million, there's no doubt about that," he said.

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The Two-Way
6:46 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Apology Demanded For Mustard Gas Experiment Subjects

A bipartisan group of members of Congress lead by Rep. Mike Honda, D-Calif., have called on Defense Secretary Ash Carter to apologize to American veterans who were used in race-based chemical weapons experiments.

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The Two-Way
6:33 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Live Samples Of Anthrax Were Sent Worldwide In May Due To Ineffective Procedure

The lab at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah failed to completely kill live samples of anthrax before sending it around the world.
Jim Urquhart AP

The Department of Defense says that the Army's Dugway Proving Ground in Utah failed to completely kill samples of anthrax in May before it shipped them to dozens of other labs around the world.

NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports that the samples of anthrax the Pentagon thought were dead, were still alive:

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The Salt
6:26 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

House To States: Don't You Dare Demand GMO Labels

A label on a bag of popcorn indicates it is a non-GMO food. House Republicans on Thursday voted in favor of a law that would block states from mandating GMO labels.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 5:28 am

The argument over genetically modified food has been dominated, in recent years, by a debate over food labels — specifically, whether those labels should reveal the presence of GMOs.

The battle, until now, has gone state-by-state. California refused to pass a labeling initiative, but Maine, Connecticut, and Vermont have now passed laws in favor of GMO-labeling.

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The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Official Watchdog Says He Needs Access To Sensitive Documents

Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's inspector general, testifies before a House committee in 2012 critical of the department's "Operation Fast and Furious." Thursday, he said a legal opinion from the department could block his office from getting documents crucial to his watchdog role.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 9:12 pm

The Justice Department's top watchdog said Thursday a newly released legal opinion undermines his independence and makes it more difficult to do his job.

Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz said the memo will delay access to grand jury, wiretap and other documents he needs to investigate problems at the Justice Department, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the FBI and elsewhere.

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Turkey Agrees To Allow Use Of Its Soil For Airstrikes Against ISIS

A U.S. Air Force plane takes off as a Turkish air force fighter jet taxis at the Incirlik airbase, southern Turkey, in 2013. Reversing an earlier policy, Ankara has agreed to allow the U.S.-led coalition to fly anti-ISIS airstrikes from the base.
Vadim Ghirda AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 11:55 pm

Updated at 11:30 p.m. ET

Turkey has agreed to allow anti-ISIS coalition warplanes to begin using the air base at Incirlik in the country's east to carry out airstrikes against the extremist group in neighboring Syria, NPR has confirmed.

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The Salt
5:33 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Diabetes

A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:59 pm

It's true that being overweight or obese is a leading risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes.

But attention, skinny and normal-weight people: You may be vulnerable, too.

Lots of lifestyle choices influence the risk of diabetes: everything from whether you smoke to how much you exercise (or don't). It turns out, what you choose to drink is also a risk factor.

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Goats and Soda
5:33 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Obama Thinks Solar Power Will Boost Kenya; Kenyans Aren't So Sure

Workers finish installing a large billboard showing Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta (left) and President Obama in downtown Nairobi, Kenya, on Thursday.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:22 am

When Jackline Mumbua decided to go solar, she knew the cost would be steep. The 35-year-old housewife in Machakos, Kenya, can barely cover the expenses of raising three school-age children on the little money her husband earns driving a motorcycle taxi. They have no savings. It took her family nearly two years to pay, in monthly installments, the $55 for a small rooftop solar panel.

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Around the Nation
5:33 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

In Hot Pursuit Of Public Safety, Police Consider Fewer Car Chases

Pursuit chases have led to crashes, like this one in Leawood, Kan., in 2004, at least 706 times in the last 10 years.
Photo courtesy of the Leawood Police Department

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:14 pm

Police officers have to make complicated, split-second decisions every day — and whether or not to chase a fleeing suspect is no exception. And they often have to make this decision while driving a car at very high speeds.

Kansas City area police chief Steve Beamer says they don't make it lightly. "We have to continually balance the need to apprehend that individual who chooses to flee against the safety of the public that may be at risk because of the pursuit," Beamer says.

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The Two-Way
5:32 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Autopsy Of Sandra Bland Doesn't Suggest Homicide, Texas County Officials Say

A guard motions to a medic (left) who arrived with a stretcher to Waller County Jail in Hempstead, Texas, on July 13, the day Sandra Bland died at the jail. Officials said Thursday that an autopsy did not find signs that Bland's death was a homicide.
Waller County Sheriff's Office Landov

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:17 pm

Releasing details — and photographs — from the autopsy of Sandra Bland, officials in Waller County, Texas, say that the cause of death for Bland, a black woman who died in the county's jail, was suicide by hanging. Officials also say she had marijuana in her system.

The case has drawn national scrutiny as Bland, who had driven to Texas from Illinois, died in police custody three days after she was pulled over by a state trooper for allegedly failing to signal a lane change. She was 28.

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