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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Army Warns Of 'Armed Citizens' Trying To Protect Recruiting Stations

Members of the FBI Evidence Response Team investigate the shooting at the Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard Recruitment Office on July 17 in Chattanooga, Tenn. Since the shooting, armed civilians have begun trying to guard such centers.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:51 pm

The Army is not happy about armed civilians who have begun appearing at recruiting stations in several states in the wake of the Chattanooga shootings, ostensibly to help guard against such attacks.

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Goats and Soda
4:51 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

An 80-Year-Old Looks Into The Eyes Of Her Teenage Self

The hand-colored photo, titled "Reclining young lady," is of Stella Osarhiere Gbinigie when she was 16.
Solomon Osagie Alonge Franko Khoury/National Museum of African Art

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 8:05 pm

She dressed up in her mother's lace blouse and wore her jewels. She and her two sisters were going to get her picture taken at a studio in Benin, Nigeria. She struck a pose. The year was 1950 and she was 16 years old.

Flash forward 65 years. Stella Osarhiere Gbinigie is in Washington, D.C., this month. She is now 80. And she comes face-to-face with her youthful portrait, hanging on the walls of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art. She had never seen the original hand-colored portrait until just this past Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Jury Confirms Aurora Theater Shooter Is Eligible For Death Penalty

A Colorado jury cleared the way for the second phase of the sentencing process for James Holmes, who was found guilty of killing 12 people and injuring 70 more in a shooting rampage at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater. One week after convicting Holmes, the jury confirmed in a unanimous finding Thursday that he's eligible for the death penalty.

The jury said that when Holmes opened fire in a crowded theater in 2012, he acted in "extreme indifference to the value of human life generally."

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It's All Politics
4:09 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Obama's First Trip To Kenya As President Is Less About His Roots This Time

A man in Nairobi, Kenya, stands in front of a mural of President Obama, created by the Kenyan graffiti artist Bankslave, ahead of Obama's trip to Kenya and Ethiopia.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 5:19 pm

President Obama leaves Thursday night on a trip that will take him back to his father's homeland, while at the same time making him the first sitting president to visit two key East African nations: Kenya and Ethiopia.

The president's first stop is Kenya. He will not visit his father's ancestral village, administration officials say, citing security and logistical reasons. But he will meet privately with relatives, who may well include his father's second wife; Obama's step-grandmother, known as Mama Sarah; and his half-sister Auma Obama.

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Shots - Health News
3:38 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Why Disability And Poverty Still Go Hand In Hand 25 Years After Landmark Law

After a long day, Emeka arrives home to the apartment in South Tulsa that he shares with his father.
Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:24 am

If you have a disability in the U.S., you're twice as likely to be poor as someone without a disability. You're also far more likely to be unemployed. And that gap has widened in the 25 years since the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted.

"Every man, woman and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, independence and freedom," President George H.W. Bush said when he signed the bill into law on July 26, 1990.

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Shots - Health News
2:56 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Administration Prods States To Scrutinize Insurers' Rate Hikes

akindo iStockphoto

There's a battle brewing behind the scenes to keep health plans affordable for consumers. The Obama administration weighed in this week, sending letters to insurance regulators in every state and Washington, D.C., that ask them to take a closer look at rate requests before granting them.

Under the Affordable Care Act, state agencies largely retain the right to regulate premiums. So far only a handful have finalized premiums for the coming year, for which enrollment begins in November.

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It's All Politics
2:48 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

How Democratic-Leaning Detroit Helped Shape Ben Carson's Conservative Views

Ben Carson is the only African-American major candidate running for president in 2016. He grew up poor in Detroit in the 1960s and paved his own path.
Jonathan Bachman AP

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 3:39 pm

Long before Benjamin Carson was a Republican presidential candidate, he was a hero and a role model.

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It's All Politics
2:46 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Think America's Roads Are Crumbling? Not Quite

High-profile events like bridge collapses or road sinkholes (like this one in Maryland in 2010) could make you think America's roads are crumbling. That's not quite true.
Logan Mock-Bunting Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:41 pm

Congress is one tiny step closer to funding America's highways, as the Senate decided Wednesday night to open debate on their transportation bill as the July 31 deadline looms. The Highway Trust Fund has been in dire straits the last few years, spending more than it's taking in. Because it gets its money from the federal gas tax, the trust fund has suffered as cars have grown more fuel-efficient and some Americans have cut back on their driving.

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Man On Train Misses His Stop, So He Pulls Emergency Release To Get Off

A man on this train pulled the emergency release, after realizing he had missed his stop.
WMATA

As a subway train left the L'Enfant Plaza station in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, a man on board realized he had just missed his stop.

Instead of doing what most of us would do — ride to the next stop and get on the next train going in the opposite direction — he decided to pull the emergency release.

Along with that version events, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority released a video that shows the man pry the doors open and then, with his child in tow, run away from the train.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Kepler Telescope Introduces Earth To A Very Distant Cousin

Artist's concept compares Earth (left) to the new planet, called Kepler-452b, which is about 60 percent larger in diameter.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 4:24 pm

NASA's planet-hunting Kepler Telescope has spotted the first roughly Earth-sized world orbiting in the "Goldilocks zone" of another star – offering perhaps the best bet so far for life elsewhere in the universe.

A year on Kepler-452b, which is about 1,400 light years from us in the constellation Cygnus, is 385 days, meaning its orbit is just a bit farther away from its star than the Earth is from the sun. That places it squarely within what planetary scientists call the habitable zone, or "Goldilocks" zone — not too cold and not too hot.

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