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NPR Story
11:44 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Why Are So Many Black Men Behind Bars In Wisconsin?

African-American men in Wisconsin are incarcerated at a rate that's nearly twice the national average, according to a new study. To find out what's behind the staggering numbers, host Michel Martin speaks with Wisconsin State Senator Lena Taylor, and Marc Mauer of The Sentencing Project.

NPR Story
11:44 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Listener Muses About Visions And Cherry Blossoms

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now the latest in our series Muses and Metaphor. We are celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing your poems that you've been sending us via Twitter. Today we hear from Sarah Jones of Seattle. She recently moved from Los Angeles with her husband and two sons and says her family made it just in time to see the cherry trees blossom. Here she is.

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Wisdom Watch
12:04 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

From The Border To The Fortune 500

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our Wisdom Watch conversation. That's where we speak with people who've made a difference in their fields.

Today, we hear from one of the most influential tech executives you probably have never heard of unless you're in that field. Not only that, his personal story is just as - if not more - interesting than those of the superstar CEOs you may have heard about in high tech.

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Religion
12:01 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Muslims On Boston Bombings: We're All Disgusted

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we will meet one of this country's most influential tech executives. We'll also hear about his very interesting personal story about how he rose from humble beginnings in Mexico to become one of this country's top leaders in high tech. That's later in the program.

But, first, we want to continue our conversation with three thoughtful Muslim Americans in the wake of the attack on the Boston Marathon and the news that two of the suspects were indeed Muslim.

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Economy
11:53 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Help Wanted, But Only Part Time

In today's economy, many people in search of work can only find part-time jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics finds the number of 'involuntary' part-time workers has doubled since 2006. Host Michel Martin talks about what this means for the workplace and the economy, with The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy.

Parenting
12:15 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Is American Daycare ... Hell?

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Money Coach
12:15 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Retirement Gone Wrong? How Seniors Can Dig Out Of Debt

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, how often have you heard that there are more black men in prison than in college? A lot? Well, we'll speak with a professor who's gone back over the research and he says that's just not true. We'll talk about this in just a few minutes.

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Race
12:15 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Are There Really More Black Men In Prison Than College?

Activists, filmmakers, and even the president invoke the conventional wisdom that there are more black men in prison than in college. Ivory Toldson, a professor at Howard University, says that's a myth; he explains his findings to host Michel Martin.

World
11:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

After Boston Bombing, A New Focus On Chechnya

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The ethnic heritage of the Boston bombing suspects, as we just mentioned, is one of the things that officials are now looking at in evaluating the case. The Tsarnaev brothers are ethnically Chechen, although their relatives tell us they never actually lived there. Their parents reportedly fled the Central Asian region in the early 1990s.

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Author Interviews
11:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Teaching Shakespeare In A Maximum Security Prison

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 12:01 pm

Many people thought Laura Bates was out of her mind when she offered to teach Shakespeare in the maximum security wing of an Indiana prison. But the prisoners found a deep connection with the playwright's words. Laura Bates talks about her experience in her new book Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

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